Tuesday, July 13, 2010

A "Patchwork" of Laws Throughout This Country

by Proof

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Remember the talking point from the Obama administration regarding the Arizona immigration law? From a senior DOJ official:
"This is about who in our constitutional system has the authority to formulate immigration policy. And as the Supreme Court has explained, and we believe the constitution makes clear, constitutional and federal law do not permit the development of a patchwork of [immigration laws] throughout this country."

Aside from the hypocrisy in allowing the de facto "patchwork" of immigration laws known as "Sanctuary cities" to exist and flourish, consider the brand spanking new "patchwork" the Obama administration wants to give us. According to Diana Furchtgott-Roth at Real Clear Markets:

I was searching the bill for a provision about derivatives. What did I find but Section 342, which declares that race and gender employment ratios, if not quotas, must be observed by private financial institutions that do business with the government. In a major power grab, the new law inserts race and gender quotas into America's financial industry.

In addition to this bill's well-publicized plans to establish over a dozen new financial regulatory offices, Section 342 sets up at least 20 Offices of Minority and Women Inclusion.

Twenty new offices, with staff and salaries and benefits and rents and all the expenses associated with government bureaucracy. If any of these financial institutions covered by Obama's "reform" were to illegally discriminate again women or minorities, do we not already have a federal watchdog in place, the EEOC?

From the Overview page of the EEOC:

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is responsible for enforcing federal laws that make it illegal to discriminate against a job applicant or an employee because of the person's race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information. It is also illegal to discriminate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit.

Most employers with at least 15 employees are covered by EEOC laws (20 employees in age discrimination cases). Most labor unions and employment agencies are also covered.

The laws apply to all types of work situations, including hiring, firing, promotions, harassment, training, wages, and benefits.
Authority & Role

The EEOC has the authority to investigate charges of discrimination against employers who are covered by the law. Our role in an investigation is to fairly and accurately assess the allegations in the charge and then make a finding. If we find that discrimination has occurred, we will try to settle the charge. If we aren't successful, we have the authority to file a lawsuit to protect the rights of individuals and the interests of the public. We do not, however, file lawsuits in all cases where we find discrimination.

We also work to prevent discrimination before it occurs through outreach, education and technical assistance programs.

The EEOC provides leadership and guidance to federal agencies on all aspects of the federal government's equal employment opportunity program. EEOC assures federal agency and department compliance with EEOC regulations, provides technical assistance to federal agencies concerning EEO complaint adjudication, monitors and evaluates federal agencies' affirmative employment programs, develops and distributes federal sector educational materials and conducts training for stakeholders, provides guidance and assistance to our Administrative Judges who conduct hearings on EEO complaints, and adjudicates appeals from administrative decisions made by federal agencies on EEO complaints.

We carry out our work through our headquarters offices in Washington, D.C. and through 53 field offices serving every part of the nation.

So, couldn't you fairly call the latest entries into the government bureaucracy a "patchwork" of anti-discrimination agencies duplicating the efforts of the EEOC?

Or is this just a system rife with patronage jobs, and cronyism, with a backdoor effort to institute quotas by another name, in one fell swoop?

Yeah. I thought so, too!

Cross posted at Proof Positive

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